The Prince of Wales was an end of terrace pub in West Street.

The Prince of Wales was known to locals as the ‘Drum’, apparently because when the pub was re-decorated in the early 1960’s some old wallpaper was revealed with the design of a monkey playing a drum. After the discovery a drumming monkey on a pole was proudly displayed near the bar of the Prince of Wales.

The CAMRA ‘Real Ale in Gloucestershire’ described it as a ‘basic one bar back street pub’.

It closed down in the autumn of 1999 when landlord Fred Dyer, who had run the Prince of Wales for 32 years, decided to retire.

The vacant land (which was the pub car park) to the east of the Prince of Wales was acquired in the redevelopment of the site and a sympathetic conversion of the existing property and new build has created an extension of the terrace. It is difficult to tell where the original building extents into the brand new development. A West Country Ales ceramic plaque, which was inlaid into the wall of the Prince of Wales, did not survive the conversion.

The pub had one of the last surviving Whitbread corporate branded pub signs in Gloucestershire depicting the Prince of Wales three plumes, it would be nice to think that it found a new home in Highgrove House, home of Prince Charles, which is just over a mile away!

Licensing Details:

Owner in 1891: W. Weare (leased Messrs N. &W. Cook, Tetbury Brewery)

Rateable value in 1891: £11.5s.0d.

Type of licence in 1891: Beerhouse

Owner in 1903: Misses Weare (leased Messrs N. &W. Cook, Tetbury Brewery)

Rateable value in 1903: £14.7s.6d.

Type of licence in 1903: Beerhouse

Closing time in 1903: 11pm

Landlords at the Prince of Wales include:

1885,1891 James Horton

1902,1903  Charles Keedwell (Charles James Keedwell in 1903)

1906 John Oates

1939 George Pullie

1960’s Charles ‘Charlie’ Dyer

1967-1999 Sue and Colin Henry ‘Fred’ Dyer (Charlie’s Son)

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