The Cock Inn is in Nibley, which is about half a mile to the south west of Blakeney. The listed 16th century coaching inn is on the A48 Gloucester to Chepstow Road at the foot of Nibley Hill.

All Beers Drawn From The Wood. But from what brewery?

Gloucester Journal: April 1889 – Littledean Police Court: George Whiting, machinist, was summoned for being drunk at the Cock Inn, at Nibley. PC Baker proved service of the summons, defendant saying it was no use for him to appear as he was drunk.  Defendant’s son proved going for his father at the inn, where he found him very drunk, and in bed with his clothes and boots on. Fined 10s and costs.

The annual rateable value of the Cock Inn was £18.0s.0d. in 1891 and 1903 and it closed at 11pm, perhaps unusual considering its rural location. It was designated alehouse status.

The Cock Inn has had some interesting brewery owners. In 1891 it was owned by Bailey & Co. Presumably this was the business of R.H. Bailey & Co., of the City Brewery, Quay Street, Gloucester. According to the Brewery History Society (A Century of British Brewers Plus 1890 to 2004) R.H. Bailey & Co were put up for auction on 14th November 1894 with 15 public houses. Perhaps the Cock Inn was the furthest tied house from the Gloucester City Brewery. The City Brewery brewery was bought by Tayler & Co. of Northeach. The pubs were sold piecemeal. R.W. Miller & Co, operating from the Stokes Croft Brewery in Bristol, acquired the Cock Inn. Miller’s beers were quite a rarity in Gloucestershire. It is worth noting that the black and white image of the Cock Inn reproduced below indicates that it was also a free house after the Second World War and had the inviting message ‘All Beers Drawn from The Wood.’

In the 1950’s the Cock Inn was part of the Stroud Brewery Co’s estate and a West Country Ales ‘Best in the West’ ceramic plaque is a reminder that it also had an association with the Cheltenham brewery and hence Whitbread.

The owners of the pub in the mid ‘noughties’ transformed the Cock Inn by introducing quality cuisine. A 2006 ‘eating out’ review in the ‘Forester’ newspaper concluded ‘I have no problem at all recommending a visit to the Cock, perhaps to try out their much more extensive menu which is available through the week and features delights like rabbit pie’. Christmas dining in 2015 gave a selection of main courses including Crispy Scottish salmon, tarragon pomme puree, winter greens, pickled carrots and Cullen skink velouté.

In the Spring of 2019 an application was submitted to Forest of Dean District Council for change of use from public house to residential. However, the Cock Inn is still trading successfully.

Landlords at the Cock Inn include:

1856,1885 Thomas Davis

1902 Henry Jones

1903 William H. Jones

1906 William Henry Canter

1919 Charles James

1927 William Buck

2006,2008 Andy Jeffs

2016 Steve and Jane Crick

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