Gloucestershire Chronicle 5th February 1870 – Publicans Row. William Jones of the Barley Mow, Southgate Street, was charged with assaulting William Powell at the Booth Hall on the 20th January. Powell said the man insulted and struck him (witness) several blows. Mr Thomas Elmore said that on the Thursday night he went to the Booth Hall and the landlord told him that he was going out and asked him if he would look round his premises. While doing so the defendant came to him and asked him if he was the old ***** that used to keep the Kings Head and struck him a violent blow giving him black eyes. The complainant went to part them, then occurred the assault upon Powell. A witness for the defence said he saw the witness with a stick in his hand and did not see the defendant strike the complainant. The barmaid of the Booth Hotel said she was there the whole time and heard the men holding an argument, but she could not tell what about. Blows were struck but she did not know who struck the first. The magistrates said they thought the complainent only did his duty in interposing and fined Jones 10 shillings with cost 9 shillings and 6 pennies.

The Barley Mow was a beerhouse in 1897. The then landlord, James Bennett, appeared in court charged with permitting drunkenness on his premises and for selling drink to a drunken person. However, the case was dismissed. The court were told that Bennett ‘had now left the city.’

The Barley Mow was tied to Mitchell & Butlers of Cape Hill, Birmingham. In a 1936 reference the Barley Mow is listed at 130 Southgate Street.

The Barley Mow was demolished in November 1988 as part of the Gloucester Docks regeneration. Condemned properties included Western Trading, Unett fireplaces, Graham Reeves, the Barley Mow and Jaco.

Landlords at the Barley Mow include:

1869 William Withers

1870 William Jones

1893 W. Sysum

1897 James Bennett

1906 W. Syson

1936 Mrs C. Anthony

1957 Albert E. Bashford

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